Are Cicadas a Health Hazard?

Will the Real Cicadas Please Stand Up?!!

2 Canthigaster Cicadas

Who knew there is such a thing as Canthigaster Cicadas? You’re lookin’ at ’em! … Or, at least, that’s what the caption said when I scoured for images…. It seems there are about 3,000 cicada species, and cicadas can be black, brown or green and can have red, white or blue eyes.

In the Northeastern United States, our explosion of cicada insects look more like this. Rather homely in comparison, right?

Magicicada by Dan KeckCicadas make me crazy when they act like they’re blind and have no radar. They’ll fly right into your face as if you weren’t there!


Maybe You’re Adventurous and Want to Try Eating Cicadas ~

Potential Allergies

Don’t eat #cicadas if you’re allergic to seafood as these insects share a family relation to shrimp and lobsters. go.usa.gov/xHg69


Cicada Flavors

But, what would they taste like and are they a “healthy snack?” Reportedly, they have an asparagus-like or greens flavor, which is attributed to the fact that cicadas spend most of their lives underground sucking sap from tree roots. That’s what’s known as “a plant-based diet!” On the other hand, connoisseurs report a certain nutty flavor attends to them when roasted.


Nutritional Value

Aside from taste, what about nutrition? Certainly some birds and animals find them a convenient high protein, low fat, low carb, and gluten-free welcome addition to their menus. Perhaps, you will too. Many cultures have such sparse resources that they rely heavily on insects for food and eat them without qualms.


National Geographic Teaches About Cicadas

Natural Geographic shared an article that educates us about the fact that “For Most People, Eating Bugs is Only Natural.” I suggest you read the only (very interesting) thing, but here is an excerpt.

The ancient Romans and Greeks dined on insects. Pliny, the first-century Roman scholar and author of Historia Naturalis, wrote that Roman aristocrats loved to eat beetle larvae reared on flour and wine.

Aristotle, the fourth-century Greek philosopher and scientist, described in his writings the ideal time to harvest cicadas: “The larva of the cicada on attaining full size in the ground becomes a nymph; then it tastes best, before the husk is broken. At first the males are better to eat, but after copulation the females, which are then full of white eggs.”

The Old Testament encouraged Christians and Jews to consume locusts, beetles, and grasshoppers. St. John the Baptist is said to have survived on locusts and honey when he lived in the desert.

Cicada Recipes + Cautionary Questions

Speaking of menus, National Geographic offers a lot more information and some recipes for you to contemplate, if you’re of a mind to do so. However, it also raises questions about whether these insects, that live underground for 17 years, absorb too much pesticides, coal, and other pollutants to be healthful in the human diet.

What’s Your Decision?

It would be very interesting to have your feedback if you have actually eaten these crustaceans. I, however, plan to graciously decline any offers to do so. Until next time, …

Let’s Get Well, Stay Well, and Live Well!

#cicadas #insects #eatingcicadas #healthyeating #MyGetWellGuru

Honey Has Medicinal Properties

Oh, Honey, Look What I Found!

Bees on Gold Flowers gathering pollen to make honeyIt all began when I was researching “honey” (like bees make) as a prescription for what ails us. That led me to Nathaniel Altman, author of Eating for Life: A Book about Vegetarianism. His publisher is Simon and  Schuster. He is the author or co-author of over twenty other books on holistic health, diet, nature, palmistry, and other metaphysical subjects.

One of those books is The Honey Prescription. Here is an excerpt.

Honey was used by the ancient Egyptians to treat skin infections and burns, while early Greek physicians prescribed honey to heal stomach problems, insomnia, sore throats, colds and other maladies. Honey remained a popular folk remedy until well into the twentieth century.

Wow! What an education when you keep looking for more! For example, I learned never to give raw honey to infants younger than one year old (see details below). Let’s explore a bit…but, first…


Disclaimer: This Website Does Not Provide Medical Advice

All information contained on this website is informational only. That includes, but is not limited to, text, graphics, images, links, and any other material. No material on this site is a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition or treatment. Do that before undertaking a new health care regimen and never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.


So, What About Honey?

honey bee on flowers

Thanks to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), I’m sharing  the abstract (summary) of an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/)

Abstract

Honey is a by-product of flower nectar and the upper aero-digestive tract of the honey bee, which is concentrated through a dehydration process inside the bee hive.

Honey has a very complex chemical composition that varies depending on the botanical source. It has been used both as food and medicine since ancient times. Human use of honey is traced to some 8000 years ago as depicted by Stone Age paintings.

In addition to important role of natural honey in the traditional medicine, during the past few decades, it was subjected to laboratory and clinical investigations by several research groups and it has found a place in modern medicine.

Honey has been reported to have an inhibitory effect on around 60 species of bacteria, some species of fungi and viruses. Antioxidant capacity of honey is important in many disease conditions and is due to a wide range of compounds including phenolics, peptides, organic acids, enzymes, and Maillard reaction products. Honey has also been used in some gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, inflammatory and neoplastic states.

This review covers the composition, physico-chemical properties and the most important uses of natural honey in human diseases.

To read the entire article (well worth it), Click Here.


PubMed Is A Great Resource for Info About Medical Research

Note: you can find all kinds of research on all kinds of subjects at PubMed.gov. Here is an excerpt from another Abstract:

It has broad spectrum anti-biotic, anti-viral and anti-fungal activities. Honey prevents and kills microbes through different mechanism such as elevated pH and enzyme activities. Till now, no synthetic compound that works as anti-bacterial, anti-viral and anti-fungal drugs has been reported in honey yet it works against bacteria, viruses and fungi while no anti-protozoal activity has been reported. Potent anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancerous activities of honey have been reported. Honey is not only significant as anti-inflammatory drug that relieve inflammation but also protect liver by degenerative effects of synthetic anti-inflammatory drugs.


Medical Grade Honey

medicalgrade honey (active Leptospermum honey [ALH])

honey in a cream-colored bowl with honey dipper

According to WebMD, Medical Grade Honey has been used for

  • Preventing and treating cancer
  • Reducing high cholesterol
  • Reducing inflammation inside the body
  • Treating diabetes
  • Treating eyeear, and sinus infections
  • Addressing gastrointestinal problems
    • The gastrointestinal organs include the organs that food and liquids travel through when they are swallowed, digested, absorbed, and leave the body as feces. These organs include the mouth, pharynx (throat), esophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine, rectum, and anus.
    • The gastrointestinal tract is part of the digestive system.

WebMD says the evidence is limited on whether it works for these conditions. It also notes:

The honey used to treat wounds is medical-grade honey. It is specially sterilized and prepared as a dressing. So the jar of manuka honey in the pantry shouldn’t be part of your first aid kit. Wounds and infections should be seen and treated by a health care professional.


Healthline Overview of Honey Usage

Raw honey has been used as a folk remedy throughout history and has a variety of health benefits and medical uses. It’s even used in some hospitals as a treatment for wounds. Many of these health benefits are specific to raw, or unpasteurized, honey. Most of the honey you find in grocery stores is pasteurized. The high heat kills unwanted yeast, can improve the color and texture, removes any crystallization, and extends the shelf life. Many of the beneficial nutrients are also destroyed in the process.


Benefits of Honey

The Healthline link I’ve provided you expands on all the items below. But, to prevent keeping you here until next year, I’ll summarize their list. Honey is:

  • A good source of antioxidants (anti-aging as it fights free radicals)
  • Antibacterial and antifungal properties
  • Healing for  wounds
  • A phytonutrient powerhouse
  • Help for digestive issues
  • A potent prebiotic, meaning it nourishes the good bacteria that live in the intestines
  • Able to soothe a sore throat + act as a cough suppressant

Are There Risks In Using Raw Honey ~ Especially for Kids?

In addition to beneficial prebiotics and nutrients, raw honey can also carry harmful bacteria such as Clostridium botulinum. This is particularly dangerous for babies. Never give raw honey to an infant less than a year old.

You can get botulism poising from raw honey. Symptoms of botulism poisoning in infants may include:

  • constipation
  • slow breathing
  • sagging eyelids
  • absence of gagging
  • loss of head control
  • paralysis that spreads downward
  • poor feeding
  • lethargy
  • weak cry

In adults, symptoms can include an initial short period of diarrhea and vomiting. You might experience constipation and more severe symptoms, such as blurred vision and muscle weakness. See a doctor if you experience any of these symptoms after eating raw honey.


Healthline shares an example of how to use honey for asthma.

Honey appears most helpful as a nighttime cough suppressant. A form of nighttime asthma, called nocturnal asthma, can cause coughing, wheezing, and chest tightness. These symptoms may disturb your sleep.

Researchers at UCLA suggest taking 2 teaspoons of honey at bedtime. It’s believed that the sweetness of honey triggers your salivary glands to produce more saliva. This may lubricate your airways, easing your cough. Honey may also reduce inflammation in the bronchial tubes (airways within the lungs) and help break up mucus that is making it hard for you to breathe.


Talk to Me!

If you already have used or decide to try using honey as a remedy for various conditions, let me know how it turns out. I’d love to hear from you!


Disclaimer

Remember, neither I nor my website provides medical advice nor do we take the place of medical advice and treatment from your personal physician. You must not use this information to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. It is merely “food for thought” and further exploration.

Please consult your physicians or other qualified health professionals about any treatment of medical conditions. I am not liable or responsible for any misunderstanding or misuse of the information contained on this site. You are solely responsible for any loss, damage, or injury caused – or alleged to be caused, directly or indirectly – by any treatment, action, or application of any food or food source discussed on this website.

The U.S. Food & Drug Administration has not evaluated the statements on this website.


Let’s Get Well, Stay Well, and Live Well

 

Soups for Winter Comfort and Good Health

Soups I Created Much to My Own Amazement

I am not a chef. I’m not even a good cook. However, these soups have received rave reviews from the people who have eaten them. Some suggested the sweet versions could be used as a dessert and could be served with vanilla ice cream!

Hints:

  1. These pumpkin or broth soups can be as think or as thick as you want them to be, simply by what amount of liquids you choose to add to the sweet ones and whether you add instant potatoes or a gravy to the savory ones.
  2. These soups may be strictly vegetarian – or not – depending on your choices about whether to add broths, chicken, fish, or other meats and if you choose to add rice or other kinds of pasta.
  3. When serving, instead of using typical white crackers, serve with oyster crackers, Ritz crackers, cornbread, or various flavors of croutons to make things special.

Continue Reading →

Classes – Holistic Healing

Nancy Wyatt dressed in white teaching classes

This page is to let you know that I’m available to teach one of my most popular seminars (which also can be presented as a workshop). It is a Class on Holistic Healing techniques and styles, also known as  “Complementary and Alternative Medicine.”

I conduct the presentation in person throughout the Washington, D.C. Metro Area and the Winchester to Warrenton regions of Virginia. Of course, I can travel to you also, if you want to pay for the transportation and hotel! It is a 5-hour class, so is not well-suited for online presentation. (I know you would multitask and/or leave the device on which you’re streaming the class! You can’t kid me!)

This class provides an overview of several assumptions, theories, ethics and modalities related to complementary and alternative wellness practices for the student to explore. It is for people who want to get well, stay well, and live well without the use of pharmaceutical drugs. See the topics, goals of the class, and my certifications below and/or scroll to the bottom to sign up! 😉 Continue Reading →

Nancy Knows Us

Greetings, People! This is just a short blog to let you know I soon will have a new website up and running. It is called “NancyKnows.us.”

The “My Get Well Guru” blog (where you are now) still will be the place to get in-depth blogs or information about various holistic healing and metaphysics topics.

The Nancy Knows Us website  also relates to wellness and metaphysics. However, its primary purpose is to better enable people to book me for Transpersonal Hypnotherapy, Life Coaching, or spiritual counseling sessions. There will be a new blog, as well. Continue Reading →

Bone Health ~ Topical Tips

Bone Health ~ Topical Tips | Surprising Suggestions

Bone Health ~ Topical Tips, Bone structure: health versus osteoporosis

Bone spongy structure close-ups: normal and with osteoporosis

Whether you are male or female, if you’re 30 or older, you have begun to lose bone density at the rate of approximately 1% per year; and, if you’re a female, who achieves menopause, the rate of loss increases greatly thereafter, so anyone can benefit from reading “Bone Health ~ Topical Tips.”  🙂

We all know we need calcium for bone health, but calcium also is critical to muscle and nerve function, blood pressure regulation, normal heartbeat, blood clotting, the health of our cells, and the release of certain hormones. However, calcium is not all we need. There are other vital nutrients that help your body absorb and use calcium. The most important of these are magnesium, vitamin D, and vitamin K. 

Bone Health ~ Topical Tips Figure measuring bone health RISK with measuring tape.Question: are you at risk for developing osteoporosis or other Vitamin D deficiency-related illness? According to WebMD, “People who have low levels of vitamin D may need supplements. Vitamin D deficiencies are more common in those who:

Here are some helpful health suggestions from three sources. Continue Reading →

Intro to Holistic Healing

What the Heck IS “Holistic Healing?”

To answer that, I’m providing a 4-hour seminar

Intro to Holistic Healing

Let’s talk about my Intro to Holistic Healing! For registration details, go to The Fairfax Spirituality & Metaphysics GroupFairfax Metaphysics and Spirituality Group  or register NOW directly with our lovely hostess Reverend Marti Giese –  Marti@blossomforth.us or by calling her at (703) 369-2606.

This intensive Intro to Holistic Healing seminar describes several different kinds of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) techniques in a broad overview. Topics include everything from specific nutrition and exercise regimens to acupuncture, Reiki, essential oils, chi machine (aerobic exerciser), drinkable clay, herbs, and more. Participants will receive extensive notes and an opportunity to suggest which of the subjects  they would like to explore further in classes specifically designed for those topics.

Sorry for the short notice about Intro to Holistic Healing; but I just got permission to put it onto this Meetup site, so I want to share the info with you, in case you live near Prince William Parkway in Manassas, which houses the beautiful venue where I’ll be teaching. Cost $40*, payable at the door.

*Because of extensive preparation and printing costs, refunds are not available for this class.

I hope to see you there and/or at future classes, which I’ll be presenting this year!

Let’s Get Well, Stay Well, and Live Well!

My Get Well Guru FB Page

My Get Well Guru FB Page

 Great Articles / Quick Tips / Reliable Sources

aromatherapy candle and bright orchid on zen stones

I’ve just created a new page where I can post all kinds of health, wellness, beauty, and meditation tips. Go to: My Get Well Guru FB Page.  Please go there and Like / Follow it, so that you can see all kinds of short suggestions, versus the long blogs I do here for My Get Well Guru.

I’ll be posting things like the wonderful research about health benefits of various herbs, foods, teas, etc., from the Medical Medium, who is a really amazing guy and provides invaluable information in easy-to-understand terms.  This is just one example of the kinds of resources to which I shall direct you.

All the sources are ones I trust or find worthy of further research; and I have used any of the products and services that I provide.

Let’s Get Well, Stay Well, and Live Well!

Raw “Cheesecake” Recipe

Featured

 

raw-cheesecake-recipe-image-1This Raw “Cheesecake” Recipe is a DELICIOSO & HEALTHY TREAT!  

Wouldn’t You Just LOVE to have a  recipe for something that tastes like cheesecake, requires no baking, and is packed with healthful ingredients?  

THERE IS NO CHEESE IN THIS RAW  “CHEESECAKE” RECIPE

Before giving you the recipe, let me answer the following question:

What Does The Raw Cheesecake Recipe Have To Do With Disabled Veterans?

Continue Reading →