Are Cicadas a Health Hazard?

Will the Real Cicadas Please Stand Up?!!

2 Canthigaster Cicadas

Who knew there is such a thing as Canthigaster Cicadas? You’re lookin’ at ’em! … Or, at least, that’s what the caption said when I scoured for images…. It seems there are about 3,000 cicada species, and cicadas can be black, brown or green and can have red, white or blue eyes.

In the Northeastern United States, our explosion of cicada insects look more like this. Rather homely in comparison, right?

Magicicada by Dan KeckCicadas make me crazy when they act like they’re blind and have no radar. They’ll fly right into your face as if you weren’t there!


Maybe You’re Adventurous and Want to Try Eating Cicadas ~

Potential Allergies

Don’t eat #cicadas if you’re allergic to seafood as these insects share a family relation to shrimp and lobsters. go.usa.gov/xHg69


Cicada Flavors

But, what would they taste like and are they a “healthy snack?” Reportedly, they have an asparagus-like or greens flavor, which is attributed to the fact that cicadas spend most of their lives underground sucking sap from tree roots. That’s what’s known as “a plant-based diet!” On the other hand, connoisseurs report a certain nutty flavor attends to them when roasted.


Nutritional Value

Aside from taste, what about nutrition? Certainly some birds and animals find them a convenient high protein, low fat, low carb, and gluten-free welcome addition to their menus. Perhaps, you will too. Many cultures have such sparse resources that they rely heavily on insects for food and eat them without qualms.


National Geographic Teaches About Cicadas

Natural Geographic shared an article that educates us about the fact that “For Most People, Eating Bugs is Only Natural.” I suggest you read the only (very interesting) thing, but here is an excerpt.

The ancient Romans and Greeks dined on insects. Pliny, the first-century Roman scholar and author of Historia Naturalis, wrote that Roman aristocrats loved to eat beetle larvae reared on flour and wine.

Aristotle, the fourth-century Greek philosopher and scientist, described in his writings the ideal time to harvest cicadas: “The larva of the cicada on attaining full size in the ground becomes a nymph; then it tastes best, before the husk is broken. At first the males are better to eat, but after copulation the females, which are then full of white eggs.”

The Old Testament encouraged Christians and Jews to consume locusts, beetles, and grasshoppers. St. John the Baptist is said to have survived on locusts and honey when he lived in the desert.

Cicada Recipes + Cautionary Questions

Speaking of menus, National Geographic offers a lot more information and some recipes for you to contemplate, if you’re of a mind to do so. However, it also raises questions about whether these insects, that live underground for 17 years, absorb too much pesticides, coal, and other pollutants to be healthful in the human diet.

What’s Your Decision?

It would be very interesting to have your feedback if you have actually eaten these crustaceans. I, however, plan to graciously decline any offers to do so. Until next time, …

Let’s Get Well, Stay Well, and Live Well!

#cicadas #insects #eatingcicadas #healthyeating #MyGetWellGuru