Castor Oil Is Your Friend

Castor Oil = The Oil That Heals

Grow It; Drink It, Rub It In,

Or Use It – Topically – In Packs

Want relief from ~ Inflammation? Digestive Issues? Joint pain?  Menstrual Cramps? Skin Conditions? Castor Oil May Help!

bottle of castor oil A common ingredient in many beauty products is castor oil (“Palma Christi”). However, it has many more applications intended to help stimulate and support the body’s own healing mechanisms.

 

Use It to Help With ~

  • Acne, rashes, and other skin irritations
  • Arthritis and painful joints
  • Childbirthing
  • Chronic infections
  • Digestive issues and associate gastrointestinal symptoms
  • Fibroids
  • Frizzy hair
  • Hydrating and nourishing skin
  • Lymphedema
  • Menstrual pain and irregularity
  • Lymphedema
  • Ovarian cysts.

You can rub it into your skin, or take a deep dive by putting it into a pack that you keep on your body for several minutes. For added effect, add heat using a heating pad. See instructions below.


Castor Oil Packs Help to:

  • Drain lymphatic system
  • Fight fungi
  • Fight viruses
  • Produce an anti-inflammatory effect
  • Improve painful conditions and swelling
  • Increase circulation
  • Increase lymphocyte production
  • Stimulate and support the immune system

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Chronic Pain, Absolution, VooDoo, & Help

Pain Hurts! (no kidding) What to Do About It 

image shows chronic pain in back and neck of woman in ponytail

Under the auspices of the Virginia Department of Health, Prince William Area Agency on Aging, I completed the certification coursework for teaching people how to deal with chronic illness. Then, the COVID-19 pandemic hit, and the final practice classes were canceled. However, I learned about several things that influence chronic conditions, including pain, and most of them confirm what I already knew and have talked about as a certified practitioner of healing modalities over many years. You may have seen my posts or have been in my classes about:

Influences Affecting Chronic Pain Levels 

  • balancing emotions – establishing methods – (e.g., physical activity, meditation, listening to music, hypnotherapy, counseling, etc.) for relieving anxiety and depression 
  • breathing – shallowly or consciously, deeply, and purposefully (There are many techniques with differing emphasis on various parts of the body.) 
  • evaluating nutritional intake – proper – or inflammatory and bone-deconstructing foods and drinks 
  • exercising – mental (learning helpful, practical skills; keeping mentally alert; distracting oneself from pain) 
  • exercising – physical (how much, when, and whether to do it while in pain) (aerobic exercise for immobile people – the chi machine)
  • making decisions – avoided or done well (with the help of a coach, counselor, or caregiver, if necessary)
  • sleeping – well or poorly (the amount needed and techniques for inducing restful sleep and for avoiding disrupted sleep. Since I’m not going into detail here, I’ll just share the link to my Sleep Like a Baby guided meditation which is available wherever you get your audio media. It put the sound engineer to sleep mid-recording session!) 
  • using self-management tasks, like: 
    • scheduling medications and making lists of questions for health care providers 
    • acquiring tools and other aids needed to accomplish functions that used to be easy (like step stools for reaching high shelves or shoe hooks for inserting feet into shoes without having to bend down) 
    • creating a plan to address emergencies 
  • using holistic healing modalities, like Reiki, massage, hypnotherapy, and natural foods and herbs. Click Here for more tools and tips. 

You Can Take the Self-Management Class for Chronic Pain and/or Illness! 

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Acute & Chronic Pain: Mind Over Matter

When You’re In Acute or Chronic Pain, All You Want Is OUT!

Woman with chronic shoulder pain I recently became certified in a program that helps people deal with chronic illness, which sometimes results in acute or chronic pain, as well. That coursework redirected my thoughts back to ways in which people (including me) have learned to deal with pain so I want to share some ideas with you after I describe the certification I now have, as you might want to attend some of the classes.

Classes in both subjects (chronic illness and chronic pain) are available for patients throughout the world. The contents are based on many years of a study conducted by Stanford University to determine if its protocol works, and it has for many people. If you would like to learn more (either as a patient or as a trainer), you can follow the links in the paragraph below. If not, just skip down to learn more about pain-handling techniques. Continue Reading →